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Alarka-YTB-229 - History

Alarka-YTB-229 - History



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Alarka

A word, purportedly of American Indian origin, whose definition has not been found.

(YTB-229: dp. 400; 1. 110'0"; b. 27'0"; dr. 11'4"; s. 12 k.; cpl. 20; a. 2 .50-car. mg.; cl. Cahto)

Alarka (YTB-229) was laid down on 31 August 1944 at Greenport (Long Island), N.Y., by the Greenport Basin & Construction Co.; launched on 20 January 1945; sponsored by Mrs. Horace W. Watts, the head of the William and Watts firm which performed electrical work under subcontract during the construction of the tug, delivered to the Navy on 5 April 1945, and placed in service on 6 April 1945. Early in May, the large harbor tug departed New York and proceeded, via the Panama Canal and Pearl Harbor, to the western Pacific. She arrived in Buckner Bay, Okinawa, late in August or early in September. She served there and later at Sasebo, Japan, where she was placed out of service sometime late in 1946. On 23 December 1946, she was sold to the Chinese Supply Commission. Her name was struec from the Navy list on 28 January 1947.


Alarka-YTB-229 - History

Correspondence, contracts, ship plan drawings, manuals, photographs, brochures, and other files pertaining to the construction, repair, and marketing of vessels, both military and civilian.

Biographical/historical information

Barbour Boat Works Inc. was founded by Herbert William Barbour in 1932 on the Trent River at New Bern, North Carolina. The company initially specialized in wooden vessels. It remained a small company until the coming of World War II. At this time the company began receiving U.S. Navy contracts for ship construction. They began expanding their facilities and soon had a payroll of over 1200 people. Ships built included salvage ships (among the largest wooden ships built for wartime use), net tenders and mine sweepers. In the coming years, more vessel contracts were obtained from the Navy, Army and Coast Guard. These included a number of 56' troop transport vessels for the Vietnam War effort (five of which were fitted with helicopter landing pads, making them the smallest carriers in the U.S.), a prototype steel fire boat and steel tug boats.

Following the war, the company began construction of both private and commercial vessels. The private vessels included rowboats, racing class sailboats, normal duty sailboats, outboard runabouts and utilities, inboard cruisers and a few larger coastal cruisers. The bulk of the private vessel construction consisted of 14' utilities and 19' and 21' cruisers in both outboard and inboard configuration. These types sold on a worldwide scale. Commercial vessels included trawlers, ferries, tankers, fishing vessels, barges and tugs.

A 155-foot seagoing tanker, delivered in April, 1972, was produced by the company for a major oil company. At the time, this was the largest ship to be built in North Carolina since World War II. The company also produced a number of custom, innovative vessels including Porpoise II (built for the Marineland Studios in Florida, it featured tanks of circulating sea water allowing transport of sea animal specimens) scallop trawlers, a Navy submersible, demountable submarine tender and a modified hull for the Navy's failed Osprey project.

During the company's long history, a number of subsidiaries were formed by the company. One of these, formed in 1955, was Reggie's Outboard Service. This subsidiary featured a complete stock of boats, motors and sporting goods, as well as a complete shop for servicing outboard motors. Also, in 1957, a complete Diesel Parts Supply division was added. The same year, the shipyard made the transition to steel construction, its first steel vessels consisting of three ferries for the state of North Carolina's eastern ferry system. The company also eventually expanded its services to accommodate repairs and conversions of vessels for both U.S. government agencies and private business. In 1945 a propeller reconditioning shop was installed at the plant, and in 1970, a complete machine shop was relocated there. The company closed in the mid-1990s.

Scope and arrangement

The material includes correspondence, contracts, ship plan drawings, manuals, photographs, brochures, and other files pertaining to the construction, repair, and marketing of military and civilian vessels. The bulk of the correspondence is between the company, dealers and individuals regarding various vessels. Some topics of discussion include boat orders, pricing, modifications, performance evaluations, lumber shortages and shipping methods. Administrative materials include employee records, order books, secretarial notebooks written in shorthand, insurance and pensions files, payroll records, tax information files, shipping and freight cost information, dealer lists by state and boat show information. There are also magazine advertisements, various trade magazines and newspaper articles written on the company and its products. Also included are a number of technical manuals (some related to the U.S. Department of Defense), microfilm, punch cards and backup tapes.

Administrative information
Custodial History

March 10, 1998 , (unprocessed), 15688 items, 124 cubic feet Records (1945-1971) of New Bern, N.C. boat works, including correspondence, contracts, blueprints, specifications, manuals, photographs, brochures, and other files pertaining to the construction, repair, and marketing of vessels. Donor: Reggie Rivenbark

November 7, 2000 , (unprocessed addition 1), 10 items, 0.5 cubic feet Operator's, Organizational, Direct Support, and General Support Maintenance Manual for Landing Craft, Utility LCU 1667-1670 (1905-00-168-5764) Specifications for Rehabilitation Landing Craft, Utility, LCU 1646 Class FY 87 and computer back-up tapes, ca. 1983, 1987, undated. Donor: Paul Fontenoy, North Carolina Maritime Museum

August 10, 2005 , (unprocessed addition 2), 3300 items, 45.30 cubic feet Records (ca. 1940's-1970's) of New Bern, North Carolina boat manufacturing firm, including correspondence, contracts, drawings and blueprints, specifications, manuals, photographs, brochures, and other files pertaining to the construction, repair, and marketing of vessels. Donor: Paul Fontenoy, North Carolina Maritime Museum

April 11, 2006 , (unprocessed addition 3), 29.0 cubic feet Records (ca. 1940's-1970's) of New Bern, North Carolina boat manufacturing firm, including correspondence, contracts, drawings and blueprints, specifications, manuals, photographs, brochures, and other files pertaining to the construction, repair, and marketing of vessels. Donor: Bill Rivenbark

September 13, 2006 , (unprocessed addition 4), 27.0 cubic feet Records (undated) including ship plan drawings (ca. 12 cubic feet), customer purchase orders (ca. 9 cubic feet), artifacts (ca. 1 cubic foot), product catalogs (ca. 2 cubic feet), shipping industry manuals (ca. 1 cubic foot), and subject files (ca. 2 cubic feet) of the Barbour Boat Works, Inc., New Bern, North Carolina. Donor: Frances D. Hayden, North Carolina Maritime Museum

October 3, 2007 , (unprocessed addition 5), 500 items, 1.83 cubic feet Collection (ca. 1968-1997, undated) of blueprints, specifications, engineering documents microfilm cards, charts of job accounts, and correspondence relating to United States Navy shipbuilding, ship repair, and ship conversion contracts, especially related to naval landing craft and to closing of the corporation. Donor: Darlene Perry, North Carolina Maritime Museum

July 29, 2020 (unprocessed addition 6), 0.25 cubic feet Addition consists of an Overhaul Manual for Fast Patrol Boat (PTF) dated February 16, 1976. Donor: Alicia S. Purifoy

Source of acquisition
Processing information

Preliminary inventories by Russ Green, Jeff DiPrizito, Kevin Nichols, Eric Bruning, and Jessica Wallace.


USS ABSD-3 Censored Naval Cover 1945 Censored WWII Sailor's Mail

Seller: nalwife ✉️ (25,082) 100% , Location: Weaverville, North Carolina , Ships to: Worldwide, Item: 233982083991 USS ABSD-3 Censored Naval Cover 1945 Censored WWII Sailor's Mail. USS ABSD-3 Censored Naval Cover 1945 WWII Sailor's Mail It was sent 6 Apr 1945. It was sent from Laurence Hurst to Louisville, KY. This cover is in good, but not perfect condition. Please look at the scan and make your own judgement. Member USCS #10385 (I also earned the stamp collecting merit badge as a boy!). Please contact me if you have specific cover needs. I have thousands for sale, including navals (USS, USNS, USCGC, Coast Guard, ship, Maritime), military posts, event, APO, hotel, postal history, memoribilia, etc. I offer approvals service with FREE shipping to USA repeat customers. Auxiliary floating drydock are US Navy floating dry docks that are able to submerge under water and be placed under a ship in need of repair below the water line. Floating drydocks then rise up under the ship raising the ship out of the water. The ship is now blocked on the deck of the floating dry dock for repair. Most floating drydocks had no engine and are towed by tugboats to locations. Floating dry docks come in a different sizes to accommodate varying ship sizes. The large floating drydocks come in sections and can be assembled together to increase the size and lift power. Ballast pontoons tanks are flooded with water to submerge or pumped dry to raise the ship.[1][2] Contents1World War 22Role3Armament4Large Auxiliary Floating Dry Docks (AFDB)5Medium Auxiliary Floating Dry Docks (AFDM)6Medium Auxiliary Repair Docks (ARDM)7Small Auxiliary Floating Dry Docks (AFD - AFDL)8Auxiliary Repair Docks (ARD)9Auxiliary Repair Dock, Concrete (ARDC)10Yard Floating Dock (YFD)11Image gallery12See also13References14External linksWorld War 2When World War 2 started the US Navy had only three steel auxiliary floating dry docks: Auxiliary floating drydock YFD-2 built in 1901 was at Pearl Harbor. YFD-2 was repairing the US destroyer USS Shaw on 7 December 1941 during the attack on the harbor. YFD-2 and USS Shaw were hit and damaged in the attack, both were repaired. [3]The auxiliary floating drydock USS Dewey built in 1905, was scuttled at Mariveles to prevent its capture by the Japanese. In 1942 Japan raised the Dewey, but it was resunk by U.S. forces.Auxiliary floating dry dock USS ARD-1, built in 1933, was also at Pearl Harbor. USS ARD-1 was a self-sustaining mobile dry dock.To reduce travel time for repair work over 150 auxiliary floating dry dock of different sizes were built during World War 2, between 1942 and 1945. These new floating dry docks built had a 400 to 100,000 ton lift capacity. Without these forward repair bases, ships would have to return to the states for repair. Between 1 October 1944 and 17 October 1945 7,000 ships were repaired in auxiliary floating dry docks. After World War 2 some of the auxiliary floating dry docks were sold for private use and a few were scrapped. Timber floating dry docks were built also for World War 2. These Timber floating dry docks had a lift capacity from 400 to 20,000 tons. These were not towed across the open ocean and were not given a US Navy class. [4][2] RoleShips in continuous use during war need repair both from wear and from war damage from naval mine, kamikaze, drive bombs and torpedoes. Rudders and propellers are best serviced on dry docks. Without remote on location dry docks, months could be lost in a ship returning to a home port for repair. Most auxiliary floating drydock had provisions for the repair crew, such bunk beds, meals, and laundry. Most had power stations, ballast pumps, repair shops, machine shops, and mess halls to be self-sustaining. Some of the auxiliary floating drydocks also had provisions for the ship under repair, but when possible, the crew of the damaged ship remained on their ship while repair was being made. Many had cranes able to lift tons of material and parts for removing damage parts and install new parts.[5] [2] ArmamentMost auxiliary floating drydock only has anti-aircraft guns for defense, as space would not allow for large guns. Typical armament were 40 mm and 20 mm machine guns. Japanese pilots sometime mistook empty auxiliary floating drydocks for a type of aircraft carrier. [6][2] Large Auxiliary Floating Dry Docks (AFDB) USS AFDB-3 with rail traveling 15-ton craneAuxiliary Floating Docks, Big, came in sections that are 3,850 tons and are 93 feet long each. Each Section had a 165 feet beam, a 75 feet molded depth and had 10,000 tons lifting capacity each. They are also known as Advance Base Sectional Docks (ABSD). Sections could be put together to lift larger ships. AFDB were needed to repair battleships, aircraft carriers, cruisers, and large auxiliary ships. AFDB-1 Artisan had 10 sections (A to J) for a total lift of 100,000 tons and was 1,000 feet long with all 10 sections installed. AFDB-1 to 7 were built between 1943 and 1945 and then towed to remote navy bases. An AFDB would have a crew of 600 to 1000 men, have a fresh-water distilling plant and be self-sustaining. They had a rail traveling 15-ton capacity crane with a 85-foot radius and two or more support barges. To pump out the water in the tanks there were two 24-inch discharge pumps on each section, each pump rated 15,000 gpm. For power there were two 350-kw diesel AC generators on each section, producing 440 volts 3-phase 60-cycle power. Had steam plants to run the pumps. Each section could store 65,000 gal. of fuel oil, this was to supply the ships under repair. For the crew to live next to the AFDB the Navy had barracks ships called APL, that dock next to the AFDB. [4][7][2][8] USS Artisan (ABSD-1) (A-J) built by Everett-Pacific and others.USS AFDB-2 (A-J) Built by Mare Island Naval Shipyard in Vallejo, California (E,F,H & I in use)[9]USS AFDB-3 (A-I) Saw fighting action in Guam, sold to Croatia in 2000[10][11]USS AFDB-4 (A-G) Built by Mare Island NSY, Air attacked on April 27, 1945. Partially sunk 1989 as reef.[12][13]USS AFDB-5 (A-G) Built by Chicago Bridge in Morgan City, Louisiana, scrapped in 1997[14]USS AFDB-6 A-G) Built by Mare Island NSY, scrapped 1976[15]USS Los Alamos (AFDB-7) A-G) Built by Chicago Bridge sold to private in 1995Post WW2AFDB-8 Machinist Built by Seebeckwerft in Germany Sold to Guam in 1997AFDB-9(A-B) built by Sun Shipbuilding in Chester, Pennsylvania sold to private in 1985, GalvestonMedium Auxiliary Floating Dry Docks (AFDM) USS Richland (YFD-64) YFD-6 - (AFDM-3) center section floated through the Panama Canal on it side. Towed by USS Alarka (YTB-229) (center) and USS Umpqua (ATA-209)(left) in 1945. Navy SeaBees turned on side with many pontoons to fit through the canalAFDM are from 6,800 to 8,000 tons and are from 528 to 622 feet long. AFDM has crew of 140 to 200 men. AFDM had a lift capacity 18,000 tons and armed with two 40mm and four 20mm guns. Had two 7 1/2 tons cranes with 16 ballast tank compartments. AFDM were built in three pieces, a long center section and two shorter sections at each end. [4][16][2][17] All AFDM had Yard Floating Docks (YFD) class numbers also. USS AFDM-1 Chicago Bridge, YFD 3, was floated through the Panama Canal on it side, scrapped in 1986[18]USS AFDM-2 Alabama DD, YFD 4, sold to private in 1999[19]USS AFDM-3 Chicago Bridge, through the Panama Canal on it side, YFD 6, sold to private[20]USS AFDM-4 Chicago Bridge, YFD 10 sold private in 1948USS Resourceful (AFDM-5) Everett-Pacific, YFD 21, sold private in 1999[21]USS Competent (AFDM-6) Everett-Pacific, YFD 62, sold private in 1997[22][23]USS Sustain (AFDM-7) Everett-Pacific, YFD 63, leased to BAE Jacksonville in 1997[24]USS Richland (AFDM-8) Chicago Bridge, YFD 64, scrapped in 2016[25]USS AFDM-9 Chicago Bridge, YFD 65, sold private in 1989USS Resolute (AFDM-10) Chicago Bridge, YFD 67, destroyed 1947[26]USS AFDM-11 Chicago Bridge, YFD 68, sold private in 2004USS AFDM-12- Kaiser Shipyards in Vancouver, Washington, YFD 69, scrapped in 1990USS AFDM-13-See YFD 70 Columbia Const. in Vancouver WA, sold private in 1969,USS Steadfast (AFDM-14) USS Kinkaid (DD-965) in floating drydock SteadfastPollock-Stockton in Stockton, California, YFD 71, sold private in 1998[27]Medium Auxiliary Repair Docks (ARDM) USS Oak Ridge (ARDM-1)Auxiliary repair dock Mobile (ARDM) are 5,200 tons and are 489 feet long. ARD had a ship form hull and lifting capacity of 3,500 tons. ARDM were used to repair destroyers, submarines, and small auxiliaries. ARDM has a crew of 130 to 160 men. [4][2] USS Oak Ridge (ARDM-1) by Pacific Bridge Company, Now US Coast GuardUSS Almagordo (ARDM-2) by Pacific Bridge, Now in EcuadorUSS Endurance (ARDM-3) by Pacific Bridge, Now in South AmericaPost WW2USS Shippingport (ARDM-4) by Bethlehem Steel, US Navy ActiveUSS Arco (ARDM-5) by Todd Pacific Shipyards in Seattle WA, US Navy ActiveSmall Auxiliary Floating Dry Docks (AFD - AFDL) USS Dynamic (AFD-6)-AFDL-6 at Virginia Beach, Va. on Nov. 2, 2006Auxiliary Floating Docks, Light (AFDL). Also called Auxiliary Floating Docks (AFD). AFD were 288 ft long, had a beam of 64 ft (20 m), and draft of 3 ft 3 in empty and 31 ft 4 in (9.55 m) flooded to load a ship. A normal crew was 60 men. AFDL displacement 1,200 tons and could lift 1,900 tons. AFDL were built as one piece, open a both ends. A few were AFDL has a crew of 30 to 130 men, living in a barge alongside the AFDL. Used to repair small crafts, PT boats and small submarines. All AFD were reclassified AFDL after the war in 1946. [4][28][29] USS Adept (AFD-23)USS Endeavor AFD-1 - AFDL-1 By Chicago BridgeUSS AFD-2 By Chicago Bridge [30]USS AFD-3 - AFDL-3 By Chicago Bridge [31]USS AFD-4 - AFDL-4 By Chicago Bridge [32]USS AFD-5 - AFDL-5 By Chicago Bridge [33]USS Dynamic (AFD-6) - AFDL-6 By Chicago Bridge [34]USS Ability (AFD-7) By Chicago Bridge[35]USS AFD-8 - AFDL-8 By Chicago Bridge[36]USS AFD-9 - AFDL-9 By Chicago Bridge[37]USS AFD-10 - AFDL-10 By Chicago Bridge [38]USS AFD-11 - AFDL-11 By Chicago Bridge [39]USS AFD-12 - AFDL-12 [40]USS AFD-13 - AFDL-13 Typhoon Ida sank off Okinawa, Japan on 16 September 1945.[41]USS AFD-14 - AFDL-14 served Espiritu Santo.[42]USS AFD-15 - AFDL-15 served at Enewetak Atoll [43]USS AFD-16 - AFDL-16 [44]USS AFD-17 - AFDL-17 served at Kwajalein Atoll [45]USS AFD-18 - AFDL-18USS AFD-19 - AFDL-19 By The Auchter Company served in Dunstaffnage a Scottish village, sold moved to Jacksonville, Florida[46]USS AFD-20 - AFDL-20 By Auchter Company served American Samoa [47]USS AFD-21 - AFDL-21 By Auchter Company [48]USS AFD-22 - AFDL-22 By Auchter Company [49]USS Adept (AFD-23) - AFDL-23 Auchter Company [50]USS AFD-24 - AFDL-24 By Doullot & Ewin in Mobile, Alabama [51]USS AFD-25 - AFDL-25 By Doullot & Ewin [52]USS AFD-26 - AFDL-26 By Doullot & Ewin [53]USS AFD-27 - AFDL-27 By Doullot & EwinUSS AFD-28 - AFDL-28 By Doullot & Ewin[54]USS AFD-29 - AFDL - AFDL-29 By Doullot & Ewin [55]USS AFD-30 - AFDL-30 By Foundation Co. Scrapped 1979[56]USS AFD-31 - AFDL-31 By Foundation Co. Later YFD 83, to U.S. Coast Guard 1947, After war moved to Singapore. [57]USS AFD-32 - AFDL-32 By Foundation Co.USS AFD-33 - AFDL-33 By Foundation Co. To Peru 1959 as AFD 106, activeFor AFDL-34 to AFDL-46 see: Auxiliary Repair Dock, ConcreteAuxiliary Repair Docks (ARD) USS ARD-1 under tow by USS Bridge 28 October 1934. USS Waterford (ARD-5) ARD-6 submerged at Dutch Harbor Alaska with Sub USS S-46 for repair 1944Built by Pacific Bridge Company in Alameda, California and are 483 feet long, beam of 71 Feet, and draft of 5 Feet. Ship displacement 4,800 tons. Crew complement 6 Officers and 125 Enlisted. Armament of Two single Oerlikon 20 mm cannon. ARD had a crew of 100 to 160 men. ARD have a bow and are sea worthy. They are self-sustaining with a rudders to help in tow moving and have two cranes with a 5-ton capacity. Normal also had stowage barge for extra space. Used to repair destroyers and submarines. Class 2 could repair Landing Ship, Tank (LST). The stern of ship is open to have the ship in need of repair enter.[4][2][58] USS ARD-1 (displacement of 2200 tons) (Built in 1933) (only one in class) [59]USS ARD-2 sold in 1963 [60]USS ARD-3 sold 1999 [61]USS ARD-4 sold 1961 [62]ARD-2-class 410 feet long, 49 feet, 4 inches wide, ARD-5 to 11:USS Waterford (ARD-5) [63]USS ARD-6 sold 1961 [64]USS West Milton (ARD-7) Scrapped in 1992 [65]USS ARD-8 sold 1961 [66]USS ARD-9 sold 1977 [67]USS ARD-10 sold, scrapped in 2014 [68]USS ARD-11 sold 1977 [69]ARD-2-class wide: 410 feet long, 49 feet, 4 inches 59 feet, 3 inches wide, ARD 12 to 32:USS ARD-12 sold 1987 [70]USS ARD-13 sold 1977 [71]USS ARD-14 sold 1980 [72]USS ARD-15 sold 1971 [73]USS ARD-16 by Pacific Bridge, sold moved to Mobile AL [74]USS ARD-17 sold 1971 [75]USS Endurance ARD-18 ARDM 3, laid up at Charleston Naval Shipyard[76]USS Oak Ridge ARD-19 ARDM 1, to United States Coast Guard in 2002 [77]USS White Sands ARD-20 by Pacific Bridge Co., (changed to AGDS-1), sold 1974 [78]USS ARD-21 reserve [79]USS Windsor (ARD-22) sold 1976 [80]USS ARD-23 sold 1992 [81]USS ARD-24 sold 1982 [82]USS ARD-25 sold 1973 [83]USS Alamogordo ARD-26 sold 2000 [84]USS ARD-27 Scrapped in 1974 [85]USS ARD-28 sold renamed Capitan Rodriguez Zamora [86]USS Arco ARD-29 sold to Iran 1971 [87]USS San Onfre (ARD-30) by Pacific Bridge Co.[88]USS ARD-31 To US Air Force in 1974[89]USS ARD-32 sold 1960 [90]USS ARD-33 (By Dravo Corp.) renamed AFDL 47 Reliance [91]Auxiliary Repair Dock, Concrete (ARDC) ARDC-13, An Auxiliary Repair Dock, Concrete Auxiliary Repair Dock, Concrete under towAuxiliary Repair Dock, Concrete were mobile drydock made of concrete, due the shortage of steel during the war. ARDC had a 2,800 tons lifting capacity. ARDC were 389 feet long, 84 feet wide, and 40 feet deep. ARDC has a crew of five officers and 84 enlisted men. Each had a 5 ton crane, with a 42 feet reach. Eight were built at Wilmington, North Carolina and five at San Pedro in Los Angeles, California.[92][93][94][2] ARDC 1 - Changed to AFDL-34 sold to Taiwan in 1959 Han JihARDC 2 - Changed to AFDL-35 scrapped in 1974ARDC 3 - Changed to AFDL-36 sold to Taiwan in 1947 Hay Tan, scuttled in 2000[95]ARDC 4 - Changed to AFDL-37 scrapped 1981ARDC 5 - Changed to AFDL-38 sold 1944 and 1981[96]ARDC 6 - Changed to AFDL-39 sold to Brazil 1980 Cidade de NatalARDC 7 - Changed to AFDL-40 sold to the Philippines 1990ARDC 8 - Changed to AFDL-41 old 1983 to North Florida Shipyard[97]ARDC 9 - Changed to AFDL-42 sold to Hurley Marine 1945, scrapped in 1975ARDC 10 - Changed to AFDL-43 scrapped 1979 [98]ARDC 11 - Changed to AFDL-44 sold the Philippines 1969 [99]ARDC 12 - Changed to AFDL-45 sold to Todd Seattle 1945, sold 1981 to Puglia EngineeringARDC-13 - Changed to AFDL-46 destroyed at Bikini in 1946 [100]Yard Floating Dock (YFD) YFD-2 The first Yard Floating Dock built in 1901, arriving Pearl Harbor 23 Oct. 1940 from New Orleans Naval YardYard Floating Dock (YFD) was used for many types of floating docks. These were mostly used for harbor or shipyard use. YFD normally had no or little crew space and were serviced from shore. Some auxiliary Repair Dock were converted to YFD. Types of YFD were: 400-ton concrete docks, 1,000-ton, 3,000-ton and 5,000-ton wood docks sectional wood docks from 7,000 to 20,000 tons lifting capacity and a three-piece self docking steel sectional docks with 14,000 to 18,000 tons lifting capacity. All Medium Auxiliary Floating Dry Docks were converted to YFD after the war.[1 Return shipping will be paid by: Buyer , All returns accepted: Returns Accepted , Item must be returned within: 30 Days , Refund will be given as: Money Back , Country/Region of Manufacture: United States , Topic: Ships, Boats , Year of Issue: 1941-1950 , Certification: Uncertified , Quality: Used , Cancellation Type: Ship Cancel , Grade: Used , Vessel: navy , Naval: Ship , Condition: Used , ERA: WWII , Country: United States , Country of Manufacture: United States , Branch: naval , Type: vessel , People & Occupations: sailor , Denomination: 6 Cent , State: Kentucky , Place of Origin: United States , Event: Naval See More


World War II

At the start of World War II, the US Navy had only three steel auxiliary floating dry docks:

  1. Auxiliary floating drydock YFD-2, built in 1901, was at Pearl Harbor. YFD-2 was repairing the US destroyer USS Shaw on 7 December 1941 during the attack on the harbor. Both YFD-2 and USS Shaw were repaired, after being hit and damaged in the attack. [3]
  2. The auxiliary floating drydock USS Dewey, built in 1905, was scuttled at Mariveles to prevent its capture by the Japanese. In 1942 Japan raised the Dewey, but it was resunk by US forces.
  3. Auxiliary floating dry dock USS ARD-1, built in 1933, was also at Pearl Harbor. USS ARD-1 was a self-sustaining mobile dry dock.

To reduce travel time for repair work, over 150 auxiliary floating dry docks of different sizes were built during World War II between 1942 and 1945. These newly built floating dry docks had a lift capacity of 400 to 100,000 tons. Without these forward repair bases, ships would have had to return to the US for repairs. Between 1 October 1944 and 17 October 1945, 7,000 ships were repaired in auxiliary floating dry docks. After World War II some auxiliary floating dry docks were sold for private use and others were scrapped. In addition to auxiliary floating dry docks, timber floating dry docks were built for use in World War II. Timber floating dry docks had a lift capacity of 400 to 20,000 tons. They were not towed across the open ocean and were not given a US Navy class. [4] [2]

During wartime, ships in continuous use need repair both from wear and from war damage such as from naval mines, kamikaze attacks, dive bombs and torpedoes. Rudders and propellers are best serviced on dry docks. Without remote on-location dry docks, months could be lost if a ship returned to a home port for repair. Most auxiliary floating drydocks had provisions for the repair crew, including bunk beds, meals, and laundry. Most had power stations, ballast pumps, repair shops, machine shops, and mess halls to be self-sustaining. Some auxiliary floating drydocks also had provisions for the ship under repair, but when possible, the crew of the damaged ship remained on ship while repairs were done. Many had cranes able to lift tons of material and parts to remove damaged parts and to install new parts. [5] [2]


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USS Osceola (YT-129)

The third USS Osceola (YT-129), previously USS YT-129, later YTB-129, later YTM-129, was a United States Navy harbor tug commissioned in 1938 and sold for scrapping in 1973.

Harbor tug USS YT-129 was launched by the Charleston Navy Yard on 3 March 1938 and commissioned on 1 June 1938. She was assigned the name USS Osceola (YT-129) on 17 September 1938.

Osceola reported to the 14th Naval District, headquartered at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. She was stationed at Pearl Harbor throughout World War II, providing assistance in maneuvering larger ships, rendered towing service for naval vessels, and aiding in waterfront firefighting. She was reclassified as a large harbor tug (YTB–129) on 12 April 1944 and was damaged during the West Loch Disaster of 21 May 1944. Ώ]

After World War II, Osceola continued to provide her vital service to the United States Pacific Fleet. Her classification changed to medium harbor tug (YTM–129) in early 1962.

Osceola was sold for scrapping by the Defense Reutilization and Marketing Service (DRMS) on 1 February 1973.


Four-wheel drive – with on- and off-road experts.

F stands for four-wheel drive! Our experts Marc, Felix and Hannes explain the exceptional capabilities of our four-wheel drive systems which can be found in our Mercedes-AMG lineup. One of the lesser known benefits of our four-wheel drive system is the Trailer Manoeuvring Assist that provides steering assistance while manoeuvring trailers.

Mercedes-AMG GLC 63 4MATIC+ Coupé:
Kraftstoffverbrauch kombiniert: 12,3–12,1 l/100 km
CO₂-Emissionen kombiniert: 280–275 g/km.¹

Mercedes-AMG E 63 S 4MATIC+:
Kraftstoffverbrauch kombiniert: 11,6 l/100 km
CO₂-Emissionen kombiniert: 267 g/km.¹

Mercedes-AMG G 63:
Kraftstoffverbrauch kombiniert: 14,4 l/100 km
CO₂-Emissionen kombiniert: 330 g/km.¹

Mercedes-AMG GT 63 S 4MATIC+:
Kraftstoffverbrauch kombiniert: 12,5 l/100 km
CO₂-Emissionen kombiniert: 285 g/km.¹


Green hell – testing ground for driving dynamics.

G stands for Green Hell! In this episode of INSIDE AMG, the experts Felix and Markus take a look at Mercedes-AMG vehicle development on one of the world’s most prominent race tracks: the Nurburgring.

Mercedes-AMG CLA 45 S 4MATIC+ Coupé:
Kraftstoffverbrauch kombiniert: 8,3–8,2 l/100 km
CO₂-Emissionen kombiniert: 190–187 g/km.¹

Mercedes-AMG GT 63 S 4MATIC+:
Kraftstoffverbrauch kombiniert: 12,5 l/100 km
CO₂-Emissionen kombiniert: 285 g/km.¹

Mercedes-AMG GT R PRO:
Kraftstoffverbrauch kombiniert: 13,1 l/100 km
CO₂-Emissionen kombiniert: 299 g/km.¹


Striving for freedom with the G-Class.

Those who strive for freedom and adventure need a reliable partner along the way. The G-Class provides a rock-solid foundation for the challenges that lie ahead.

Production: crossline media // Instagram // Website
Talent: Hanna Hörmann // Instagram
Assistant & bts: Martin Schumann // Instagram
Voiceover: Muriel Leonie Graf // Instagram

G 350 d:
Kraftstoffverbrauch kombiniert: 8,9–8,7 l/100 km
CO₂-Emissionen kombiniert: 235–229 g/km.¹

In our new video series, INSIDE AMG, Product Manager Felix Schönhofer meets talented Mercedes-AMG experts.

For over 40 years, the Schöckl in the mountains of Graz has been the ultimate test for every G-Class.

The G-Class is built to last. Unlike other thing,s as this ballet dancer is about to find out…

The S-Class stands for legendary as well as traditional engineering. It defines the luxury segment in the a.

In this video, highlights such as the MBUX and the new suspension of the new GLE are highlighted.

Have a look at how the new S-Class will redefine your concept of high-end technology and comfort.

Discover the multifaceted world of the G-Class and be inspired by the values that this exceptional off-road.

The G 63 AMG 6X6 embodies a perfect synthesis of uncompromising extravagance and technical perfection.

The near-series show car G 500 4x4² is a new highlight in the history of the G-Class and blends all the adv.

The new all-electric EQS from Mercedes-EQ. The ultimate in luxury, in a breathtaking design.

The brand’s hallmark combination of ultimate luxury and cutting-edge technology.

As an all-electric compact car from Mercedes-EQ with seven seats, the EQB offers room for the whole family.

Product may vary after press date on 04.03.2021.

1 Die angegebenen Werte wurden nach dem vorgeschriebenen Messverfahren ermittelt. Es handelt sich um die „NEFZ-CO₂-Werte“ i. S. v. Art. 2 Nr. 1 Durchführungsverordnung (EU) 2017/1153. Die Kraftstoffverbrauchswerte wurden auf Basis dieser Werte errechnet. Der Stromverbrauch wurde auf der Grundlage der VO 692/2008/EG ermittelt. Weitere Informationen zum offiziellen Kraftstoffverbrauch und den offiziellen spezifischen CO₂-Emissionen neuer Personenkraftwagen können dem „Leitfaden über den Kraftstoffverbrauch, die CO₂-Emissionen und den Stromverbrauch aller neuen Personenkraftwagenmodelle“ entnommen werden, der an allen Verkaufsstellen und bei der Deutschen Automobil Treuhand GmbH unter www.dat.de unentgeltlich erhältlich ist.

4 Angaben zu Kraftstoffverbrauch, Stromverbrauch und CO₂-Emissionen sind vorläufig und wurden vom Technischen Dienst für das Zertifizierungsverfahren nach Maßgabe des WLTP-Prüfverfahrens ermittelt und in NEFZ-Werte korreliert. Eine EG-Typgenehmigung und Konformitätsbescheinigung mit amtlichen Werten liegen noch nicht vor. Abweichungen zwischen den Angaben und den amtlichen Werten sind möglich.

6 Stromverbrauch und Reichweite wurden auf der Grundlage der VO 692/2008/EG ermittelt. Stromverbrauch und Reichweite sind abhängig von der Fahrzeugkonfiguration. Weitere Informationen zum offiziellen Kraftstoffverbrauch und den offiziellen spezifischen CO₂-Emissionen neuer Personenkraftwagen können dem „Leitfaden über den Kraftstoffverbrauch, die CO₂-Emissionen und den Stromverbrauch aller neuen Personenkraftwagenmodelle“ entnommen werden, der an allen Verkaufsstellen und bei der Deutschen Automobil Treuhand GmbH unter www.dat.de unentgeltlich erhältlich ist.

8 Alle technischen Angaben sind vorläufig und wurden intern nach Maßgabe der jeweils anwendbaren Zertifizierungsmethode ermittelt. Es liegen bislang weder bestätigte Werte vom TÜV noch eine EG-Typgenehmigung noch eine Konformitätsbescheinigung mit amtlichen Werten vor. Abweichungen zwischen den Angaben und den amtlichen Werten sind möglich.


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